FACTS

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00:13:02
BETWEEN 2000-2015, FOR EVERY 1 DOLPHIN CAPTURED
AT LEAST 12 MORE WERE KILLED
00:21:08
SHARKS KILL 10 PEOPLE PER YEAR. COMPARATIVELY,
PEOPLE KILL 11,000-30,000 SHARKS ARE KILLED PER HOUR
00:21:45
STUDIES ESTIMATE THAT UP TO 40% OF ALL MARINE LIFE CAUGHT IS THROWN OVERBOARD AS BYCATCH
00:22:35
AN ICELAND FISHERY IN ONE MONTH KILLED APPROX. 269 HARBOR PORPOISES, 900 SEALS OF FOUR DIFFERENT SPECIES
AND 5000 SEABIRDS
00:29:04
THERE IS ENOUGH LONG LINE SET EVERY DAY TO WRAP AROUND THE PLANET 500x 
00:29:17
SIX OUT OF SEVEN SPECIES OF SEA TURTLES ARE EITHER THREATENED OR ENDANGERED DUE TO FISHING
00:34:25
THE FISHING INDUSTRY KILLS MORE ANIMALS IN A DAY THAN THE DEEP WATER HORIZON OIL SPILL DID IN MONTHS

Professor Callum Roberts: "I've looked at various papers, and it seems like as many as 600,000 seabirds might have been killed by the oil spill and 5000 marine mammals. Fish are more resilient as they are not air breathers, but oil is toxic to them so there was a potential downturn in some populations. However, fishing is a massive source of mortality. The total landings of all fish from the Gulf for 2009, the last full year before the blowout, was 651,000 tonnes. That is 1783 tonnes per day. If the average weight of a fish killed in that catch was a conservative 0.5 kg (and lots of it is shrimp, which are much smaller), then that would make 1,783,000 x 2 = 3,566,000 animals caught per day. Shrimp fisheries kill about 5 times more catch by weight than they land, so the figure for animals killed but not landed is very much higher. Trawls also kill many animals on the seabed that don't make it to the boat, so you could double that higher figure again, conservatively. So we are looking at a number 
of animals killed by fishing every day which has got to be far far in excess of the numbers killed by oil."




https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/programs/public_lands/energy/dirty_energy_development/oil_and_gas/gulf_oil_spill/a_deadly_toll.html#:~:text=We%20found%20that%20the%20spill,crabs%2C%20corals%20and%20other%20creatures
.
https://www.fws.gov/southeast/news/2016/06/deepwater-horizon-oil-spill-killed-as-many-as-102000-birds-across-93-species/
https://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/Assets/economics/documents/feus/2011/FEUS2011%20-%20Gulf%20of%20Mexico.pdf
https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/news/apr17/dwh-protected-species.html
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/227199353_Bycatch_quotas_in_the_Gulf_of_Mexico_shrimp_trawl_fishery_Can_they_work
00:37:33
IN THE 1830'S A TYPICAL FISHING BOAT CAUGHT 1-2 TONS OF HALIBUT PER DAY, BUT TODAY THE ENTIRE FISHING FLEET CATCHES 1-2 TONS ACROSS THE ENTIRE YEAR
00:38:45
VIRTUALLY EMPTY OCEANS BY 2048

The claim that we could see virtually empty oceans by 2048 was sourced from a projection contained in the paper: ‘Impacts of Biodiversity Loss on Ocean Ecosystem Services’ author Boris Worm (a marine conservation biologist) et al (reference below). This projected that all the world’s commercially exploited fish species would have experienced collapse by 2048 (based on the extrapolation of regression in Fig. 3A to 100% in the year 2048), i.e., that to continue to commercially exploit these populations would become impossible by 2048.
https://news.stanford.edu/news/2006/november8/ocean-110806.html


Critics of the film have said that this projection date was corrected in the 2009 paper ‘Rebuilding Global Fisheries’ (reference below), authored by Worm and others, including fisheries scientists (who analyse marine populations from a business perspective using measurements such as maximum yield from fisheries rather than markers of species conservation by marine conservationists). The 2009 paper does not correct, but rather cites the earlier paper, showing that some rates of decline had slowed since 2006 (in ‘5 out of 10 ecosystems‘) but that 63% of assessed fish ‘stocks’ worldwide ‘required rebuilding’. Furthermore, fish populations in places with little management capacity – mainly the developing world and constituting a majority of fish landed – are faring much worse than those with better resources for management.
(https://science.sciencemag.org/content/sci/338/6106/517.full.pdf ). 

In summary, the 2006 study has not been corrected or retracted, and has been cited over 3,000 times. Many of its critics are industry-funded, including the most quoted author Professor Ray Hilborn, who, according to his own website, receives funding from the fishing industry. (according to Greenpeace over $3.5 million: https://www.greenpeace.org/usa/research/overfishing-denier/; his industry funding was largely undeclared until the Greenpeace investigation)
https://t.co/a3gS0hDQQR?amp=1


In 2016 Boris Worm in his paper ‘Averting a Global Fisheries Disaster’ again found the outlook very poor, summarising that population health had in fact declined since his original study, and that 88% of ‘stocks’ would be overfished and well below their target biomass by 2050.
https://www.pnas.org/content/113/18/4895


Further, in 2018, the Secretary-General of UNCTAD (Mukhisa Kituyi) and the UN Secretary General’s Special Envoy for the Ocean and Co-Chair, Peter Thomson reported that nearly 90% of typical fish stocks in the oceans will be gone by 2050 (link below), saying global subsidies for large commercial fishing must stop.
https://unctad.org/news/90-fish-stocks-are-used-fisheries-subsidies-must-stop
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/07/fish-stocks-are-used-up-fisheries-subsidies-must-stop/


Lastly, in 2020, an FAO report used figures up to 2018 which show that 59.6% of fish stocks are "maximally sustainably fished" and 34.2% of stocks are "fished at biologically unsustainable levels". In summary, 93.8% of fish stocks are either biologically unsustainable or at their maximum level of exploitation. 
http://www.fao.org/fisheries/en/

There is a problem of moving goalposts that is unacknowledged in most of the above assessments: the target stock size at which a fishery is considered to be sustainable has been lowered over the last couple of decades by fisheries scientists. This means that without any improvement in management, more fish stocks are considered sustainable today than they were three decades ago
https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/advance-article/doi/10.1093/icesjms/fsaa224/6050569?login=true

The outcome of this altered approach –which lacks a sound basis in ecological science – is that fishing is more risky, with a greater probability of causing population collapse, has more impacts on the environment and ocean health, and reduces resilience of ocean ecosystems to global change.

00:39:09
THE POWER OF ANIMALS MOVING UP AND DOWN THE WATER COLUMN IN TERMS OF MIXING IS AS GREAT AS THE WIND, WAVES, TIDES AND CURRENTS COMBINED
00:41:37
LOSING JUST 1% OF THE OCEANS CARBON STORES IS THE EQUIVALENT TO RELEASING THE EMISSIONS OF
97 MILLION CARS
00:42:25
EVERY YEAR 25 MILLION ACRES OF FOREST ARE LOST, EQUIVALENT TO LOSING ABOUT 27 SOCCER FIELDS
PER MINUTE
00:42:33
BOTTOM TRAWLERS WIPE OUT 3.9 BILLION ACRES PER YEAR, EQUIVALENT TO LOSING 4,316 SOCCER FIELDS PER MINUTE
OR THE LAND AREA OF...
Dr. Les Watling & Dr. Elliott Norse calculated that each year, worldwide, bottom trawlers drag an area equivalent to twice the lower 48 states of the U.S.

United States lower 48 states = 3,119,884.69 square miles (8,080,464.3 km2)
(Source: https://brilliantmaps.com/alaska-usa/)

x2 = 6239769.38 square miles or 16160928.6 km2

 

Equivalent to: 3,993,452,426.567 ACRES (3.9 Billion Acres)

Also equivalent to the land area of:

                      UK: 59921819.5 acres,                    

France, 159086692 acres, 

Spain: 125032852 acres 

Germany: 88221810.4 acres

Italy:  74462241.4 acres

Sweden:  110563596 acres 

Finland: 83626391.6 acres

Norway: 95185734.3 acres

Portugal : 22786081 acres

Denmark: 10648759 acres

Iceland: 25451854.3 acres

Japan: 93398915.2 acres

Greenland: 535230256.3 acres

Mexico:  485314969.2 acres

Thailand : 126794713 acres

Australia : 1900734594 acres 

1 soccer field = approx. 1.76 acres

Minutes in a year: 525,600

 

Therefore, 3,993,452,426 divided by 525,600 (mins per year) = 7597.89274353 acres per minute.

Then, divide that by 1.76 acres (soccer field size) =

4,316.98 Soccer fields per min

00:51:15
OVER 80% OF THE INCOME OF THE MSC COMES
FROM LICENSING THEIR "SUSTAINABLE" LABELS
00:51:51
IN PAPUA NEW GUINEA 18 FISHERIES OBSERVERS WENT MISSING WITHIN LESS THAN FIVE YEARS
01:00:27
WEST AFRICAN CANOE FISHERMEN HAVE THE HIGHEST MORTALITY RATES OF ANY FISHERIES JOB ON EARTH
01:00:46
FOREIGN SUBSIDIZED FISHING IN WEST AFRICA CONTRIBUTED TO THE CAUSE OF THE EBOLA EPIDEMIC
01:05:13
FARMED SALMON HAVE COLOR ADDED THROUGH
FEED (ASTAXANTHIN) TO MAKE THEIR FLESH ORANGE/PINK
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